Bergen, Norway 11 – 13 June, 2019

Programme

Change day
  • 08:30 - 09:00

    Morning coffee in exhibition hall

  • 09:00 - 09:05

    Welcome to day 2

    Simon Davies, Conference Moderator

  • 09:05 - 09:25

    Energy outlook

    Keisuke Sadamori, Director, Energy Markets and Security, International Energy Agency(IEA)

  • 09:25 - 09:45

    Standardization – the new innovation

    Elisabeth Tørstad, CEO Oil&Gas, DNV GL

  • 09:45- 10:00

    UTF Subsea Project Award 2015

    Award winner interviewed by Simon Davies

  • 10:00 - 10:30

    Coffee and exhibition

  • Track 1 @ Peer gynt

    Track 1 @ Peer gynt

    Improved Asset Value and Siginificant Cost Reductions

    Track 1 @ Peer gynt

    Session leaders: Per Christian Eriksen, Aker Solutions and Tim Crome, Technip

    Track 2 @ Klokkeklang

    Track 2 @ Klokkeklang

    Simplification, Standardisation and Enhanced Industry Collaboration

    Track 2 @ Klokkeklang

    Session leaders: Martin Dove, BP and Torkild Reinertsen, Reinertsen

    Track 3 @ Troldtog

    Track 3 @ Gjendine

    Technological innovations – Materials, Mechanical and Marine disciplines

    Track 3 @ Gjendine

    Session leaders: Bård Espelid, DNV GL and Vidar Fondevik, Nui

    Track 4 @ Troldtog

    Academia and student papers

    Track 4 @ Troldtog

    Session leaders: Rune Høyvik Rosnes, Oceaneering adn Marie Bueie Holstad, CMR

  • 10:30 - 11:00

    10:30 - 11:00, Track 1 @ Peer gynt

    Water Management for Subsea Gas Production.

    Christopher J Kalli, Consultant – Process Engineering, Chevron

    Water Management for Subsea Gas Production.

    Remote offshore gas fields are commercially challenged by a lack of infrastructure. Subsea production is generally seen as the solution but comes with numerous challenges of its own that often results in significant costs offsetting the potential savings of a subsea development. A substantial proportion of these costs are associated with management of the key flow assurance risks; corrosion, hydrates, scale, liquids hold up and solids. These risks arise directly from the challenge of transporting unprocessed gaseous production fluids over long distances. This presentation describes a vision of success and a number of technology opportunities and approaches that together offer the possibility of managing these flow assurance challenges with much reduced cost. However, success will most likely depend on the industry sharing a common vision and the creation of meaningful alliances and collaborations involving operators, the service industry and research organisations.

    10:30 - 11:00, Track 2 @ Klokkeklang

    Subsea well stream compression development: a collaborative approach for an experience-based design optimization

    Rune Vesterkjær, Manager Engineering, Process & Design, Emerging Subsea Technologies, Aker Solutions

    Subsea well stream compression development: a collaborative approach for an experience-based design optimization

    Subsea gas compression has been recognized as a real opportunity to maximize return for brownfields as well as new discoveries, with a significant potential for reduced CAPEX and OPEX compared to traditional topside solutions. In addition, cash constraints with the oil companies’ and reduced oil prices have resulted in a strong focus on cost reduction and standardization for better predictability in project execution and risk minimization. The objective of this presentation is to share the latest developments for an optimized and cost-effective subsea well stream compression system, combining the robustness and maturity of qualified technologies with the need for economically feasible solutions in challenging market conditions. Extensive engineering work and several technology qualification programs have been completed as part of Åsgard Subsea Compression and Ormen Lange Pilot projects; a large number of key components have been qualified for subsea service. Valuable experience and lessons learned gained by the teams involved the execution of these projects – from conceptual design to actual delivery of the equipment – have formed the basis for the development of a minimum viable subsea well stream compression solution. Examples on how competence acquired through design, fabrication and extensive testing of subsea compression systems has been used to challenge requirements, whilst keeping qualified core functionality, will be shown. This has allowed achieving major reductions in size, CAPEX and OPEX for the optimized well stream compression solution. Finally examples of tight collaboration throughout the supply chain, with close cooperation with key sub-suppliers for specific design optimizations will be presented.

    10:30 - 11:00, Track 3 @ Troldtog

    Dead legs innovative insulation design for subsea multiphase high-boost station

    Pierre-Jean Bibet, MPP specialist in Total

    Dead legs innovative insulation design for subsea multiphase high-boost station

    The Oil & Gas industry is facing new subsea challenges as existing deep offshore fields are now depleting and some new coming fields present difficult development or production challenges like limited reserves, remote areas, complex fluids. Installation of subsea boosting systems enables to balance the reservoir depletion with time and thus to extend the production plateau and increase total recovery of fields. With the qualification of the first high boost multiphase pump (developed by OneSubsea), Total achieved a major new milestone in subsea pumping of fluids from a deep offshore reservoir, using a high pressure pump (150 bar) with the ability to handle fluids containing a large volume of residual gas. The multiphase pump module is thermally insulated in order to prevent hydrates formation during production and shutdown. A recirculation line enhances the pump operating envelope and provides minimum flow protection. Depending of the operating conditions, the recirculation line may be closed at times, creating long dead legs where temperature can drop rapidly. The use of appropriate thermal bridge transferring heat from a warm location of the pump module enables to maintain the temperature above the hydrate formation temperature. The insulation design has been fully qualified and thermal performances have been successfully confirmed with a full scale thermal test of the multiphase pump module.

    10:30 - 11:00,

    SUBPRO: A new Norwegian research innovation center on subsea production and processing

    Sigurd Skogestad, Professor, Norwegian University of Science and Technoliogy

    SUBPRO: A new Norwegian research innovation center on subsea production and processing

    The objective of the SUBPRO center at NTNU is to become a leading international subsea research center that provides top quality candidates, knowledge, innovations and technology in partnership with the most important industrial players in the field. The center receives over an 8-year periode about 30 million NOK annually, of which the resarch council contributes 12 million NOK and the industrial partners the rest.  Based on discussions with industry, the SUBPRO project will therefore focus on two main areas: 1. Subsea systems engineering – Modelling and simulation of subsea components and systems – System design: Design for more available and robust subsea systems – Safety: Barrier philosophy for subsea facilities  – Operation: Monitoring and prediction of equipment and system state – Control: Development of robust and self-optimizing control strategies  2. Subsea separation  – Fundamentals of heterogeneous systems – Solid/liquid separation – Liquid/liquid separation and water management – Gas-liquid separation – New process concepts   The center will at any time have about 20 PhD candidates and 7 researchers (post. Docs included). 40 PhD degrees (in average 5 each year) are planned over the whole 8-year period. In addition, 50 master degrees are planned annually within the field.    Expected areas of industrial application and commercialization are:  • Improved design of subsea process/production equipment, primarily water separators. • New methods for optimal design of control systems  optimal operation of subsea systems. • Better systems engineering/design for development of subsea solutions for new oil and gas fields with respect to processing and production performance, reliability, maintainability, reduced investment and reduced operating costs.  • Methods for assessment of mechanical condition and remaining useful life.

  • 11:00 - 11:30

    11:00 - 11:30, Track 1 @ Peer gynt

    Power under pressure- innovated solutions for the next wave of brownfield developments

    Bjørn Rasch, Head of Subsea Power, Siemens Subsea AS

    Power under pressure- innovated solutions for the next wave of brownfield developments

    Siemens Subsea develops and qualifies a full subsea power distribution solution where we plan to finalize main qualification tests already in 2015. Final test in water will take place early 2016. The Subsea Power Grid is a flexible toolbox which enables more subsea processing with intelligent power solutions. This presentation will focus on cost effective and compact stand alone solutions which optimal serves single consumers in brownfield developments. Standalone subsea variable speed drives directly fed from a topside switchgear enables subsea boosting with a minimum of topside infrastructure required. In this way marginal discoveries can effectively be tied in to existing facilities independently from available space on the vessels. Optimized subsea VSD technology especially for smaller subsea power consumers also supports future production technologies like “dual boost” or “cable installed ESP” in a cost-effective manner.

    11:00 - 11:30, Track 2 @ Klokkeklang

    Coordination and standardisation of Completion/Workover systems in Statoil

    Terje Holten, Project Manager- AOR Workover System's, Statoil. Kjartan Eggen, portfolio manager for workover systems in the subsea delivery team in projects in TPD

    Coordination and standardisation of Completion/Workover systems in Statoil

    Workover systems are used on subsea wells, but not all the time. They are needed for well completion, repairs (intervention), or permanent plugging. The rest of the time they are stored in warehouses, and many of the licenses with subsea wells have their own system. Not so in the future. Workover systems are expensive, between NOK 600 million and NOK one billion per system. This represents several billions worth of equipment that is standing by most of the time. Therefore Statoil has allocated the units in our tool pool management system, and the strategy is by optimizing the different tool groups Statoil will include new licensees in existing tool groups: The licenses that need such systems may buy into existing packages, and licenses that already have such systems will be paid for their deposits. Maintenance cost and storage cost will be reduced accordingly. Prerequisite is the new planning tool for allocation of equipment towards operational needs. In the future we will also see more standardisation both of subsea systems and workover systems, and we expect to reduce the costs significantly for future needs by adding sub-systems to the equipment groups instead of buying new complete packages. Statoil is also mapping which systems that are best suitable towards our rig portfolio to: Secure safe and efficiently handling on the rig, reduce rig modification cost, optimize systems to ensure operability, HSE , dynamic positioning (DP) vs anchored operations and reduce WoW.

    11:00 - 11:30, Track 3 @ Troldtog

    Duplex Stainless Steel - The choice for subsea components

    Sophia Ekman, Development Engineer, Sandvik Materials Technology (Research and Development)

    Duplex Stainless Steel - The choice for subsea components

    During the last decade, hydrogen induced stress cracking (HISC) has caused a number of failures for super duplex subsea components exposed to cathodic protection. One common factor for these failures has been that the failed duplex stainless steel had been exposed to high stresses in combination with a coarse microstructure or presence of intermetallic phases, which is a result of manufacturing processes. Because of this guidelines have been developed to avoid future problems.  This paper summarizes results from laboratory tests performed on different product forms in duplex stainless steels simulating materials subjected to cathodic protection. Different loads have been applied relating to the material´s yield strength (Rp0.2) at a temperature of 4°C. Results show that fine grained tube and bar material (10-30µm austenite spacing) can withstand 120% of the yield strength without crack initiation, while material with a coarse microstructure (austenite spacing > 30µm) show risk for HISC at 90% of the yield strength. A case story of a retrieved super duplex tube that has been subjected to cathodic protection for 6 years without failure is also discussed. The results for material with a coarse microstructure are in line with the guidelines developed to avoid HISC while fine grained material do not suffer HISC at stress levels up to the specified minimum yield strength (SMYS).  The paper also discusses a proposed mechanism for the occurrence of HISC in duplex stainless steels.

    11:00 - 11:30,

    Student Presentation: A Study on a Compact Wankel Multiphase Pump for Subsea Processing

    Yuqiao Zhao, phd student, Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore,

    Student Presentation: A Study on a Compact Wankel Multiphase Pump for Subsea Processing

    In subsea processing, multiphase pumping plays an important role, which enhances reservoir-to-wellbore inflow by lowering wellbore pressure and hence increases total recovery and delays well abandonment. The current multiphase pumps being installed in the offshore oil and gas fields all have limitations, mainly in rapid-changing and/or high gas volume concentration of the produced well fluid. This paper presents a new rotary positive-displacement pump design (Wankel Pump) for subsea applications, whose profile is based on trochoidal curve and the conjugating envelope. The design was initiated from the typical rotary mechanism successfully used in Wankel Rotary Engine, which was designed to handles gas-vapour mixture. On the other hand, together with its compactness in design, simplicity in construction and potentially valveless configuration, Wankel Pump has good potential to work not only as a subsea multiphase pump but also as a subsea wet-gas compressor. The study in this paper is mainly to investigate how the Wankel pump design handles single phase liquid flow and low GVF mixture. A simplified 2D CFD model based on dynamic mesh scheme is presented in this paper to study the delivery flow characteristic and the flow field inside the Wankel pump body. Simulations have been done for single phase flow (liquid), low GVF gas-liquid flow and fluctuating GVF gas-liquid flow conditions. Experiments have also been conducted to study the flowrate patterns in delivery flow and to visualize the flow field inside the prototype with the aid of high speed camera. Comparisons between the CFD simulation and experimental results are presented in this paper as well.

  • 11:30- 12:00

    11:30- 12:00, Track 1 @ Peer gynt

    Combining Seabed Boosting Pumps and Alternatively Deployed ESPs to Improve Recovery Subsea

    Erik Torbergsen, Program Manager, OneSubsea

    Combining Seabed Boosting Pumps and Alternatively Deployed ESPs to Improve Recovery Subsea

    Paleogene fields in the Gulf of Mexico face well-documented production challenges, such as low permeability, weak drive, deep reservoirs, and deep water.  In order to achieve economically attractive levels of recovery, many operators are exploring artificial lift systems.  One such option is to pair seabed boosting pumps with high reliability in-well electric submersible pumps.  A program to evaluate the feasibility and benefits of such a system has been launched: DualLiftTM  The primary objective of this study was to document the feasibility of a DualLift system and compare its performance to standalone seabed boosting pumps.  Work included developing a full-field system layout and simulating production for a range of reservoir and system assumptions using Petroleum Experts GAP.  Another major objective of the study was to document the impact of ESP reliability on the production availability of a DualLift system given the historically inconsistent performance of ESPs.  A comprehensive availability model was developed using reliability data for individual system components; ESP reliability, ESP intervention time, and rig deployment time were varied to determine their impact on overall system availability.  The results of the availability model were then combined with the steady-state production results to calculate a range of net present values.  Primary findings from the study were that DualLift was able to recover 20% – 50% more oil than seabed multiphase boosting alone by significantly lowering bottom hole flowing pressures.  Additionally, the DualLift concept was found to add positive net present value and achieve industry-standard production availability targets by utilizing moderately reliable alternatively deployed ESPs. In total, the combination of seabed boosting pumps and in-well ESPs should be considered as a viable method of enhancing recovery from challenging offshore oil fields.

    11:30- 12:00, Track 2 @ Klokkeklang

    Sonsub SUBSEA BUS: Background and Roadmap for the future Subsea Factory

    Alessandro Radicioni, Manager Subsea Field Development Engineering, Saipem SpA

    Sonsub SUBSEA BUS: Background and Roadmap for the future Subsea Factory

    The anticipated adoption  of subsea processing technologies in the future subsea field developments entails an increased level of functional complexity to be deployed on the seabed. The introduction of a higher level of functional complexity in subsea systems shall be supported by a total system availability which will not be only dependent on individual technologies and associated equipment reliability but also on a set of key drivers which shall govern the overall Subsea System configuration and that shall include elements such Interchangeability, Re-Configurability,  Expandability, Installability Inspectability and Retrievability To this end, the standardization of subsystems/modules and the standardization of interfaces among subsystems/modules and with Subsea Production Systems or other facilities shall be key.  For the above, the philosophy to develop  “open sources architectures” through standardized Functional Building Block and standardization of the relevant interfaces is being pursued by Sonsub (Saipem brand name and industrial platform for the Subsea Factory) for its subsea processing technologies and proprietary solutions including the  Subsea Gas/Liquid Separation System (Multipipe Separator), Liquid/Liquid Separation System (SpoolSep), and The Sea Water Treatment and Re-Injection System (SPRING).   The paper illustrates the “open source architectures” conceived by Sonsub for its proprietary technologies along with the proposed standardization principles to allow the integration  of a system independent from any proprietary products or equipment and exclusive interfaces.

    11:30- 12:00, Track 3 @ Troldtog

    Challenges related to equipment design and qualification to 20 ksi and 400° F

    Paal Bratland, Principal Mechanical Engineer, OneSubsea Processing. Jean-François Noel, Principal Engineer Mechanics

    Challenges related to equipment design and qualification to 20 ksi and 400° F

    There is a trend in the oil and gas industry to develop high-pressure and high-temperature (HPHT) reservoirs up to 20 ksi/1378 bar and 400° F/203° C. API 6A and API 17D, which are the most commonly used design standards for HPHT equipment, ends at 15 ksi/1034 bar and 350° F/177° C. New design standards to address the conditions beyond API 6A and API 17D have not been released yet; however, test programs based on the API 17TR8 ‘HPHT Design Guideline for Subsea Equipment’ draft(s) have begun. Due to the expected loads and failure modes, API 17TR8 is based on use of elastic plastic analysis as per the 2013 edition of ASME VIII-2 or fracture mechanic analysis as per ASME VIII-3 to determine suitability of equipment design. To provide sufficient design data, material qualification for the new HPHT equipment will involve fatigue testing and crack growth testing in an actual anticipated process environment. This presentation will describe how the new requirements of design, material, and verification are used in the development of a new HPHT subsea multiphase flowmeter for conditions exceeding API 17D. It will also identify gaps in the new design guidelines, where it will be up to the manufacturers to define an appropriate way of verifying and validating special components’ ability to provide integrity at the severe design conditions.

    11:30- 12:00,

    Student Presentation: Monitoring of Subsea Cyclonic Separator Performance using Static Pressure Measurements

    Sunday Kanshio, PhD Candidate, Oil and Gas Engineering Centre, Cranfield University

    Student Presentation: Monitoring of Subsea Cyclonic Separator Performance using Static Pressure Measurements

    The emergence of subsea processing is gradually driving interest in more gas-liquid compact separation technology. Liquid carryover to the gas outlet is an indication of poor separation and therefore a critical performance indicator for any gas-liquid compact separator. During oil and gas production, it is important for the operator to know how the separator is performing real time to make a quick and inform decision. Existing subsea separation project example Shell Perdido, depends on the riser differential pressure to know whether or not the subsea separator is experiencing liquid carryover. While this approach can provide the operator with information about liquid carryover, the liquid carryover phenomena would have happened occurred long ago before it is detected. In this research, a new approach for identifying liquid carryover phenomenon in compact gas-liquid pipe cyclonic separator has been proposed. This approach involves measurement of static pressure and liquid holdup at a section close to separator gas outlet prior to and during liquid carryover phenomenon. This approach has been tested on laboratory scale pipe cyclonic separator at Cranfield University. Analysis of the measured pressure data for all the conditions under which liquid carryover occurred reviewed a unique trend which is different from those conditions when the separator is not experiencing liquid carryover. It could be suggested from the results that static pressure could be a cheap and reliable method for monitoring the performance of compact gas-liquid separators installed in deepwater.

  • 12:00 - 13:15

    Lunch and exhibition

  • Track 1 @ Peer gynt

    Track 1 @ Peer gynt

    Field Development Concepts and Experiences

    Track 1 @ Peer gynt

    Session leaders: Terje Clausen, Subsea 7 and Torolf Hæhre, Shell

    Track 2 @ Klokkeklang

    Track 2 @ Klokkeklang

    Technological Innovations - Control, Power and Instrumentation

    Track 2 @ Klokkeklang

    Session leaders: Tonje Dahl, ClampOn and Tom Eriksen, NCE Subsea

    Track 3 @ Troldtog

    Track 3 @ Gjendine

    Technological innovations – Materials, Mechanical and Marine disciplines

    Track 3 @ Gjendine

    Session leaders: Tom Eddy Johansen, FMC Technologies and Per Arild Nesje, Kongsberg Oil&Gas Technologies

    Track 4 @ Troldtog

    Simplification, Standardisation and Enhanced Industry Collaboration

    Track 4 @ Troldtog

    Session leaders: Michael Starkey, ExxonMobil and Bård Espelid, DNV GL

  • 13:15 - 13:45

    13:15 - 13:45, Track 1 @ Peer gynt

    Subsea to subsea live pigging

    David R de Miranda, Asset Manager - UK Pipelines, Gassco and Keith Lathwell, Project Manager, DeepOcean

    Subsea to subsea live pigging

    The Gjøa Gas Pipeline live pigging campaign is considered to be the first diverless intelligent pigging operation to be done subsea to subsea using production gas and maintaining full export operations.  The Gjøa Gas Pipeline transports rich  gas from the Gjøa/ Vega fields through the Gjøa platform on the NC S to the UK FLAGS pipeline. The 28”pipeline has a   length of ca 131 km and has been operated by Gassco since 2010. The cleaning and  inspection of the pipeline was conducted in November 2014. A MFL (Magnetic Flux Leakage) intelligent pig was used. Diverless launch and receipt of MFL had not been done before. Onshore pig launch tests were conducted to provide comfort that it was possible to launch the pigs with Naphtha and to receive them safely subsea without significant risk to production operations.  Experience from the successful offshore operations will be used for development of future generation of subsea pig launch and receipt equipment and pigging procedures..  The successful completion of the diverless Gjøa live pigging project demonstrates the operational feasibility of subsea to subsea diver-less pigging opening up opportunities for subsea connection of  pipelines through subsea tie-in projects.  It thus also negates the need to connect new pipelines to existing riser platforms, significantly improving field development economics for greenfield and brownfield developments.

    13:15 - 13:45, Track 2 @ Klokkeklang

    Improving fault identification in subsea power systems

    Kristin Moe Elgsaas, Senior Product Manager, Subsea Power, GE Oil&Gas

    Improving fault identification in subsea power systems

    This presentation explains how an innovative high voltage connector design can be used to efficiently locate faults in subsea power systems.    Downtime in subsea production systems causes significant economic losses and quick fault identification and rectification is a key to reduce life of field costs. In systems that also include subsea power & processing, the number and types of modules that must be checked for failure increases.  While some power modules might be monitored, smaller equipment such as connectors and jumpers are typically not. In case of failures in these interconnections or un-monitored equipment, it is critical to understand what has failed to ensure the right module is retrieved. A connector capable of acting as an insulation switch can ease and speed up this identification.   The MECON is a clean environment connector emphasizing reliability and process control. Mechanical mating of the connector halves and electric engagement has been split in two independent actions separated by a flushing process that ensures proper dielectric properties inside the connector prior to electric engagement. The connector is designed to withstand full system voltage when mechanically mated but electrically dis-engaged without any insulation breakdown. These characteristics allow for systematic fault searching. Such a method could significantly reduce the cost of failures in subsea power & processing systems.   The presentation will introduce both the unique design concept for the high voltage connector and the process for rapid fault location.

    13:15 - 13:45, Track 3 @ Troldtog

    Field Gradient Sensor (FiGS) - New Innovative CP Inspection Technology

    Jens Christoffer Werenskiold; Senior Engineer, FORCE Technology

    Field Gradient Sensor (FiGS) - New Innovative CP Inspection Technology

    In order to ensure technical integrity and safety on offshore assets, the Field Gradient Sensor FiGS is a solution that accurately measures the current state of anodes, pipelines and critical structures. Its sensitivity surpasses all other sensors available today, and allows you to make more qualified decisions regarding lifetime extension and anode consumption. The FiGS has already proven its success on a buried pipeline survey for one of the leading Oil companies on the Norwegian continental shelf, with a quality and accuracy of readings and results as never seen before. The survey resulted in substantial retrofit cost savings for the client. Among its capabilities, the sensor can be used to detect coating defects on pipelines that are exposed, buried and rock-dumped. Its ability to detect very small FG values (0,1µV/cm) means that even small coating defects can be detected and measured accurately. The FiGS has two sensing electrodes rotating around a common axis at 4Hz, measuring the relative field gradient in the seawater. Due to the physical shift between the two reference cells, the system is not influenced by cell drift, and filtration of noise fields from the ROV improved. The sensor measures both the strength and the direction of electric fields, enabling accurate calculation of anode and cathode current densities with pinpoint accuracy. Its efficacy and efficiency is beyond comparison, leaving you confident in the results provided to you, swift and effortlessly.

    13:15 - 13:45,

    Standardization of umbilical – is that possible?

    Liv Molvik Lundegaard, Portefolio manager, North Sea projects, Nexans Norway AS

    Standardization of umbilical – is that possible?

    In cooperation with Statoil, and during project execution of the first Statoil Standard Project 2013-2014, Nexans has developed a Standardized delivery of umbilical. Project execution, work procedures, documents, engineering, single elements and product are simplified and standardized. Nexans has a tradition to deliver technically challenging custom made products in complicated and engineering extensive projects. During the execution of these standard projects, the same organization and engineers had to change mindset; think simplification, cost saving and have a strong focus on future reuse of their work, documents or designed items. Standard design had to take into account also future use in coming projects, cost saving, increased predictability or flexibility for our customer. A pragmatic approach and open, good communication with Statoil and strict discipline on both sides made this possible.

    The experience from the project execution in five Statoil Standard project shows that the standardization is absolutely possible, not 100 %, but to an extent that is a good start and beneficial for both parties.  Further development of the standardized deliveries could be obtained by a more extensive cooperation across interfaces and between operators with regards to their technical requirements.

  • 13:45 - 14:15

    13:45 - 14:15, Track 1 @ Peer gynt

    Subsea Factory - Standardization of the Brownfield Factory

    Rune Mode Ramberg, Chief Engineer Subsea Technology and Operations, Statoil ASA

    Subsea Factory - Standardization of the Brownfield Factory

    Objectives/Scope: As part of the corporate technology strategy Statoil has launched a technology plan for the Subsea Factory concept. The plan describes how to combine subsea production and processing technology elements with key business cases and define enabling and cost-efficient field development concepts. Methods, Procedures, Process: While there has been a gradual increase in the complexity of the subsea processing systems we have also advanced our analytical and modelling approach to subsea processing concept evaluation and selection. In our recent concept evaluation we have used an integrated modelling approach, in which subsea processing options are directly linked to reservoir models, flow lines and surface facilities. This enables us to see value added in terms of increased reservoir productivity, but also overview of entire system behaviour from reservoir to the topside, throughout the expected field life. Results, Observations, Conclusions: The cost level within subsea has increased by a factor 2.5 over the last 10-12 years. Statoil aims at establishing an Business agreed standardisation on subsea processing interfaces and modules. This standardisation strategy will allow suppliers to compete within modules/technology elements, but standardise on module size and open interfaces to achieve plug-and-play functionality
    The goal is to reduce costs and improve competitiveness of subsea solutions:
    • More profitable subsea developments • Increased subsea processing volume Statoil believes that alignment with the other operators is vital to succeed in establishing a global, open standard. This will be a “Win-win solution” for O&G Industry
    • Standardisation enabling cost reduction through simplification • More profitable subsea developments
    • Increased subsea processing volume (=> win-win-solution for the O&G industry)

    13:45 - 14:15, Track 2 @ Klokkeklang

    Conductivity measurement for multiphase and wet gas flow conditions, for both oil and water continuous flows

    Harald Solheim, PhD, project engineer, OneSubsea Processing

    Conductivity measurement for multiphase and wet gas flow conditions, for both oil and water continuous flows

    On-line measurement of water salinity is important for many applications in multiphase and wet gas flow metering. Applications range from detecting formation water breakthrough for flow assurance purposes to updating water density input to gamma-densitometry-based flow meters. In this paper, the employment of an open-ended coaxial reflection probe for estimating water salinity in three-phase flow will be described. The limited sensitivity depth of the reflection probe, based on microwave technology, means that it is sensitive to the bulk electrical property of the fluids in its close vicinity. When placed in a liquid-rich location of a blind T pipe spool, the reflection probe is suitable for both the multiphase and wet gas flow conditions. This is providing comparable salinity-estimate accuracy for the full range, from low to very high GVF. While a microwave transmission system will fail to estimate water salinity for many oil-continuous flows, the intermittent presence of water in the close vicinity of the reflection probe flush at the pipe wall helps achieve a reasonable salinity estimate.

    13:45 - 14:15, Track 3 @ Troldtog

    Autonomous Inspection Vehicle; A change in Conventional Thinking

    Jim Jamieson, Technology Manager (Life-of-Field), Subsea 7

    Autonomous Inspection Vehicle; A change in Conventional Thinking

    The introduction of new technology by Subsea 7 has led to the development of the AIV Mk1 system. A targeted program to deliver an enhanced service offering, a program that started in 2010 with a vision statement, “To deliver a robust, reliable commercially viable autonomous hovering vehicle to achieve a new method of subsea inspection”. The program builds on the experience of Subsea 7 with ROV systems and a decade of autonomous systems research and development. The Mk1 AIV represents the first milestone in Subsea 7’s autonomous vehicle roadmap where the meaning of the “I” will evolve from Inspection to Intervention. Through a commitment to enhancing performance and value to our customers, Subsea 7 has actively pushed forward the technology needed to deliver this autonomous vehicle.

    13:45 - 14:15,

    Cost from where? – Functional requirements versus detailed specifications

    Ole Petter Hjelmstad, Department Manager Engineering, Subsea 7

    Cost from where? – Functional requirements versus detailed specifications

    Opposite to the Drilling market, the traditional Subsea SURF market is mainly driven by a cost plus approach. I.e. when the technical solution is defined, the final cost only vary with the margin on top. A well-defined and standardised SURF field development guarantee a consistent bidding process, track record and cost, but not always the best technical and most cost effective solution since  the competition is limited to the “top margin” only.   By allowing Contractors to compete on their innovative technologies, specific asset base, competence, track record etc., Contractors have a wider arena to compete on. Simply allowing Contractors to compete on their full capabilities and not only what an Operator or Design house assume is the most favourable solution. This approach may lead to significant cost reductions in the short term and further cost reductions in the long term since Contractors are encouraged to be innovative within their core business.  The presentation will focus on the various cost elements in SURF field developments and how cost reductions can be achieved through Functional requirements versus detailed specifications.  The cost of Subsea field developments have increased significantly in recent years and combined with falling oil prices this has led to an increased focus on how to reduce cost. This paper will focus on how this could be achieved through specifications of “Functional requirements” rather than standardisation only.

  • 14:15 - 14:30

    Coffee break

  • 14:30 - 15:30

    Panel discussion: Subsea under pressure - who is driving the cost?

    Carl Andreas Holm, Partner and Managing Director, Boston Consulting Group
    Rasmus Sunde, Chief Executive Officer Forsys Subsea Ltd
    Roald Sirevagg, Statoil
    Odd Strømsnes, Managing Director, Technip
    Per Arne Nilsen, Head of Subsea Technology, Total France
    Moderator Jeremy Cresswell

  • 15:30 - 15:45

    Summary and closing

    Conference moderator Simon Davies